What is Radon

Radon: A silent, killer gas

According to an article from Michigan State University Extension, children are in particular danger from elevated radon levels because they “take more breaths than adults, which means their aspirations are twice that of an adult. This is why radon testing is extremely important because often there aren’t any symptoms related to the gas until a doctor diagnoses one as having lung cancer.”

“People should learn a little more about radon and the effects it may have on your household, especially your children. People usually think of radon when they have recently purchased a house. As part of some of the preliminary checks, people usually have a radon test done just to be aware of the possible issues with it.

Radon is a colorless, odorless gas and comes from the natural breakdown of uranium found in water, rock and earth. As this occurrence happens, radon rises to the surface into homes, water and air. Like carbon monoxide, radon is extremely harmful because there are symptoms of dizziness, headaches, nausea or anything that would alert someone that they are breathing in the deadly gas. Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer, the first being smoking. It is of great concern for youth because they take more breaths than adults, which means their aspirations are twice that of an adult. Therefore, radon testing is extremely important because often there aren’t any symptoms related to the gas until a doctor diagnoses one as having lung cancer.

This odorless, tasteless, invisible gas is found in soil and rocks as a result of the decay of naturally-occurring radium and uranium in the earth. High levels of radon have been discovered in all 50 states. It can seep from the ground into homes, schools, offices and other buildings through cracks in the foundation, walls and joints. As most people spend the majority of their time at home, it is most likely the location where you and family members will have the greatest exposure to radon.

Radon is found in outdoor air as well as in the indoor air of buildings. In some parts of the country, it has also been known to infiltrate groundwater. When groundwater is used for drinking and other common household activities including showering, cooking and washing dishes, the radon gas is released into the air further increasing the existing radon levels in your home. While only 1-2 percent of radon in the air comes from drinking water, it does contribute to radon exposure over your lifetime.”

 

Source 

D Radon Mitigation & Plumbing

Mitigation Lic # RNM2015206

Plumbing Lic. #055-044334

630.768.5958

  • Data herein is for information purposes and outside sources have been utilized. 
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